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Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale

Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale

Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale

Monaco-based brokerage house Imperial has proudly announced its appointment as the central agent for the sale of 41m OKKO built by Mondomarine, with the price upon application.

OKKO is a slick, all-aluminium, semi-displacement superyacht with three impressive decks and a powerful bulbous bow. Her twin MTU M91 engines deliver more than 1,750kW each, and the combination of her engine power with the hull and bow shape ensure smooth sailing and low fuel consumption. With a cruising speed of 14.5 knots, OKKO glides through the water seamlessly and quieter than most thanks to specific vibro-acoustic work that ensure greater acoustic insulation and decreased vibration issues.

Designer Giorgio Vafiadis has created a detailed exterior with several large outdoor relaxation spaces and a spacious sundeck space built to specification. This area has been created to hold a maximum of 12 guests comfortably whilst offering scenic views and is perfect for relaxing with the addition of a bar, BBQ, Jacuzzi, seating and sunbeds.

Vafiadis has tried to blend contemporary styling with comfort, using Glyn Peter Machine furniture, Tai Ping carpentry, along with Fendi and Cavalli extras throughout to create a stylish and relaxed interior. The use of mixed African Frake wood helps to create a serene environment that is pleasing to the eye and is also durable.

Five generous ensuite cabins provide accommodation for 10 guests. The owner’s suite occupies a generous space forward on the main deck with the ensuite finished in marble and back-lit onyx. The remaining four guest cabins are situated on the lower deck, comprising two doubles and two twin cabins with Pullman berths. Each cabin has its own Kaleidoscope system offering a wide selection of world cinema from your iPad, and a large selection of A/V amenities.

Built with care and attention to detail, OKKO is a contemporary and stable vessel designed purely for the comfort of guests and her owners.

Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
Imperial lists Mondomarine 41m OKKO for sale
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S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group

S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group

S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group

The World Yacht Group has announced the successful sale of S/Y Philanderer. The 40-metre sailing yacht is a modern, fast performance vessel that was built by Concorde Yachts in 1992 and features a design by Pekka Koskenkyla, interior styling by Derek Frost and naval architecture by Farr Yacht Design.

The sale involved Mac Pajot representing the buyer, Ruben Llaudet at World Yacht Group representing the seller and James Greenwood at Worth Avenue assisting.

Philanderer accommodates up to ten guests in a five stateroom layout including a master en suite cabin that features a Jacuzzi and private office. She also features an upper and lower saloon with a formal dining area as well as large deck areas that offer al fresco dining.

In addition guests can enjoy Philanderer’s list of toys and tenders which includes a five-metre Novurania Equator 500 tender, a three-metre Imnasa semirigid Rib 300, kayaks, windsurf with different sails, water skis, wake boards and snorkelling equipment.

In 2009 she underwent a major interior refit, which saw her fully refurbished, and her layout adapted to accommodate a new cockpit. The works included the fitting of new navigation and communication equipment, audio/video equipment, tender & toys and fridges. In 2012 Philanderer underwent a technical refit that led to the batteries, electric panels and parts of the generator being replaced. The works also saw a new alarm system being installed and new safety gear being supplied to meet the commercial registration requirements for worldwide cruising.

According to Worth Avenue, Philanderer had an impressive charter history in Mallorca, Ibiza and Italy.

S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group
S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group
S/Y Philanderer Sold by World Yacht Group
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Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris

Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris

Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris

After 13 years in the making, Conrad Shipyard has delivered their flagship, a 40-meter superyacht christened Viatoris (Latin for ‘traveller’); the biggest yacht ever to be made in the country. Polish shipyard Conrad aims to prove themselves in the same league as the Germans and Dutch with their newest and largest project to date.

Set to make her debut at the Monaco Yacht Show in September, Viatoris was christened in the presence of owners and project staff during a series of intimate events over the weekend with family and friends. Guests included Andrew Langton of Reymond Langton Design responsible for the exterior, the Diana Yacht Design team responsible for naval architecture, honorary guests like Frank Neubelt, representatives from Ocean Independence and Fraser, as well as media from Europe, Russia, and the Middle East.

As is customary for Conrad Shipyard, all employees were able to enjoy the fruits of their labour with onboard tours alongside family members and friends, as a sign of gratitude from the company. 

She is expected to leave the shipyard on the 20th of June for her maiden voyage to the fjords of Norway, after which she will be returned to Poland for maintenance and checks. From there, she will go on to tour several Northern European cities including London and Hamburg before proceeding to her base in Croatia. 

Designed in close cooperation with the owner, the 40-metre motor yacht features exterior styling by British design studio Reymond Langton and naval architecture by Dutch firm Diana Yacht Design. The interiors boast the finest materials and elegant yet understated design details, which are both aesthetic and functional with decor imbued with Europe’s top design houses in London, Milan, and Paris.

The result is a luxury yacht that can safely, efficiently, and comfortably cross the Atlantic while being operated by a relatively small crew.

Her feature at the Monaco Yacht Show is highly anticipated and will mark a great step forward for the Conrad Shipyard. Furthermore to the milestone delivery for the yard, Conrad has reserved the expertise of building Viatoris to create a semi-custom model to continue production and build on their new position in the superyacht market. 

Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris
Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris
Conrad Shipyard Delivers Newly Christened Viatoris
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M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med

M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med

M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med

IYC announce the successful inhouse deal of M/Y Kinta built by Turquoise Yachts in 2008.

Kinta, an excellent example of the Turkish shipyard’s construnction and engineering, has been sold in an in-house deal with Scott Jones introducing the buyer and Mark Elliot and Kevin Bonnie representing the seller. Kevin Bonnie, Managing Partner at IYC revealed, “[It was] an interesting closing with a group effort from IYC, with the Fort Lauderdale office handling an American buyer and Monaco taking care of the sale and international seller.” 

The 54.65m motor yacht underwent a major refit between 2010 and 2011, which saw the interior designer Jean Guy Verges completely update the older model to reflect current contemporary interior styles, with a touch of sophistication and glamour.

With stunning dark Wenge flooring, a beautiful blend of soft camel colour Italian and dark textured leather, alongside new textiles of ‘milk white’ and ‘ice white’, Verges has created an elegant and warm interior space for guests. This harmony of leather and dark woods is continued in the owner’s suite, an impressive space which boasts floor to ceiling windows along the full beam, providing 180-degree views.

Offering direct access to the forward deck, oversized walk-in wardrobes and even a private study and lounge, the owner’s suite offers great opulence and is located just ahead of the VIP stateroom, which is also full-beam and boasts its own lounge and large ensuite with jacuzzi. An elevator and main staircase connect all guest decks for easy movement around the yacht. A large spa pool with glass waterfall, flanked by two staircases, has always proved especially popular with guests and adds considerable draw for potential charters. 

Bonnie also explained that the vessel will be equipped with all new toys and equipment for the charter market, including sea-bobs, jet skis, water slides and 37ft chase boat – all details which will increase her popularity should her new owner wish her to earn her keep. 

Not just a luxurious yacht, Kinta is able to cruise at a generous 14 knots, with a maximum speed of 16 knots, and is powered by twin 1750hp CAT engines with a range of 4,000nm. With such high-tech features onboard as satellite internet and WiFi, the vessel ensures seamless connection when on board, and every guest space has advanced entertainment and AV systems.

M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med
M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med
M/Y Kinta Sold by IYC: Ready for Summer in the Med
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50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical

50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical

50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical

Built by Amels in 2001, Mercury underwent a complete refit in 2006 when she was redesigned by Reymond Langton to offer a warm and contemporary feel throughout.

M/Y Mercury (ex Malibu), a 50 metre fully custom yacht delivered by Amels in 2001, is now offered for sale and charter with West Nautical. She is an elegant yacht able to accommodate 12 guests in five cabins – a master cabin, two VIPs and two twins with Pullman beds. The master cabin boasts its own private salon and office. Extensive deck spaces incorporate ample seating and dining areas with large sun pads, relaxation chairs, also a hot tub and a bar. With a steel hull and aluminium superstructure, exterior styling was by Terence Disdale

Undergoing a complete refit in 2006, Mercury was redesigned by Reymond Langton to offer a warmer, more contemporary feel throughout. In the main salon guests benefit from comfortable seating and huge panoramic windows that offer impressive views out to sea, in addition to an adjoining dining area that is able to accommodate 12 guests for formal dinner parties. A bridge deck lounge is perfect for after dinner lounging with huge, indulgent sofas. 

Presented in immaculate condition, Mercury’s relaxed interior has a timeless and broad appeal with pale, deep carpets, cream upholstery fabrics all set off against dark woods. Walls are clad in pale warmer wood tones with elegant trims and a dazzling lighting scheme sets off the interiors to their best advantage. 

Running with a crew of 12, Mercury has a maximum speed of 15 knots, with a cruising speed of 13 knots. She has air conditioning throughout, in addition to WiFi and stabilisers at anchor. Berthed in Tivat, Montenegro, she is available for inspection upon request.

Mercury is now available for SALE and CHARTER with West Nautical.

50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical
50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical
50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical
50 metre Mercury For Sale With West Nautical
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Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter

Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter

Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter

Following the first ever successful silent auction for a charter on board 73 metre Lürssen built Titania this winter, Burgess is now inviting sealed bids for all dates from 4th to 22nd June.

Burgess asks that bids must be for a minimum of a seven day charter. A number of locations are available: France, Corsica, Sardinia, the Amalfi Coast and Sicily. The Balearics will also be considered but will be subject to delivery fees. Bidding is open now and will close on 1st June for charters starting on 7th June with all other bids closing on 4th June 2018. 

Titania has just completed a magnificent interior refit and any recent visitors coming on board have been hopelessly seduced by her effortless indoor-outdoor lifestyle and sumptuous light flooded interior. She boasts vast entertainment spaces, superlative accommodation and state-of-the-art amenities.

The brand new interior includes seven cabins – two breathtaking master suites, a VIP cabin and four doubles, all with beautifully appointed marble bathrooms and the latest entertainment systems. This vast interior space is all accessible by the on-board elevator that forms a central focus of her impressive foyer.

Recently extended to the stern by 3.8 metres, her new beach club delights guests with a sauna, bar and sofa and can be converted into a stylish nightclub for those looking to continue the party into the night. A complete water park can also be deployed from the beach club to provide a safe splash zone, inflatable slide, trampoline and climbing frame – fantastic fun for a family charter in warm waters. A large top deck pool and spa with resident massage/beauty therapist and hairdresser are available for an experience of total relaxation.

With two incredible Michelin-trained head chefs onboard and a charter-friendly, professional and highly appraised crew of 21, Titania has made her mark as a world class charter yacht. Triumphing at the MYBA Barcelona Show, Titania received exceptional feedback especially for her ‘delectable’ food and exquisite presentation. 

Titania can also be secured for her regular seasonal fees. For more information and availability info contact Burgess

Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
Burgess Holds Silent Auction for Titania Charter
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The Rise of Fuel-Efficient, Long-Distance Explorers

The Rise of Fuel-Efficient, Long-Distance Explorers

The Rise of Fuel-Efficient, Long-Distance Explorers

Producing a yacht in today’s environmentally sensitive era, it would be remiss of any yacht builder to overlook the sustainable qualities of its creations. As superyachts come under media scrutiny during this year’s Monaco Grand Prix, it seems important to emphasise just how the yachting industry is collectively moving towards a more sustainable future. Along with the rise of the eco-conscious owner, a yacht’s green credentials and fuel economy have become a big factor in securing a sale.

A project to entice such an owner is the Hot Lab 67M explorer by Italian shipyard VSY. A company at the forefront of ecologically responsible construction, VSY’s creation has a staggering 5,000 nautical mile range, making it extremely fuel efficient. “Fuel economy is a big factor on owners’ minds – both in terms of cost and environmental implications,” says Richard Gray, the IYC broker attached to the Hot Lab 67M project. 

“We’ve had some solid enquiries for the project,” Gray adds. “I believe there’s no other yacht of a similar size that has comparable lines to the Hot Lab 67M.” Gray also revealed that the yacht will comply with the ECO notation from Lloyd’s Register, which is a voluntary standard for environmental ship design, construction and operation beyond normal class requirements. “Owners who are keen to explore the farthest corners of the oceans are generally more environmentally aware and may even contribute to environmental research trips with their own cruising habits,” explains Gray. 

The sustainable explorer is a growing class of yacht more tuned in with environmental efficiency, engineered with lowered pollution and emission techniques to provide a guilt-free cruising. Ingrained in the construction ethos is a respect for the far-flung habitats these yachts will visit.

With the huge distances many owners now want to travel comes a natural lean towards fuel efficiency. Another yacht offering an extraordinary 5,000 nautical mile range is Admiral Yacht’s Momentum 50m Explorer, currently in build. Admiral has been a great pioneer of hybrid propulsion technology and is known for its environmental credentials. 

The trend is clear and the environmental advances will have ramifications for future yachts in build, whether they are designed for long or short distance cruising. Of course, no-one can argue that the most fuel-efficient yachts are those that exploit the power of the wind and, as Oceanco’s 106.7 metre Black Pearl proves, with the right sail plan – three 70-metre Dynarig carbon masts and 2,900 square metres of sails – fuel can be virtually left out of the equation entirely. 

The Rise of Fuel-Efficient, Long-Distance Explorers
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First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold

First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold

First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold

Built for the waters of the Bahamas and beyond, the titular ‘Caribbean’ range by Moonen Yachts has this week gained its first Martinique superyacht after signing a contract just before its launch in May.

The 36-metre superyacht is a high-tensile steel and aluminium mix with features on board dedicated to enjoying life close to the water. The open deck spaces blend in with ample areas for lounging, or enjoying a cocktail on the sun deck, while the beach club packs both room to enjoy the water and a fleet of toys to get you on it, or in it.

Designed by Rene van der Velden, this modern, stripped-back statement of effortless style is a versatile machine that fits the Mediterranean as much as its home ground of the Caribbean, with a low draft and attractive size that fits everywhere from Portofino to Nelson’s Dockyard.

The 350GT Martinique has now been sold to new clients and marks the very first of the range to enter construction after the Matica model Bijoux, due to be customised to the personal tastes of the owner before her launch at the close of May.  

Dubbed the YN197, the Moonen Martinique is a twin-screw, three-deck fast displacement yacht with a focus on spending time together. Thanks to a large lounge area, ample deck spaces and accommodation spanning four guest cabins as well as the Owner’s cabin, the comfortable, quiet and economical Martinique is growing in popularity.

Preparing to debut the new Martinique at the Monaco Yacht Show, Moonen is also now embarking on a new project with the build of a sistership to project; cementing the popularity of yachts in the mid-range sector built for the superyacht lifestyle.

First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold
First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold
First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold
First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold
First Moonen Martinique New Build Project Sold
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The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht?

The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht?

Jimmy Cornell gives his expert analysis of the essential features that any offshore cruising yacht should have

Choosing a boat for offshore cruising is not a decision to be taken lightly. I have researched this topic on dozens of rallies, speaking to hundred of skippers. Everyone you speak to will have a different point of view about which boat is best and why, but few question the importance of getting it right.

No matter what your budget, there is a bewildering array of choice and a number of important decisions to make, any one of which could severely impact the enjoyment and eventual success of your voyage. What follows may serve as a checklist for first-timers as well as seasoned ocean sailors in helping to decide the essential elements concerning safety, comfort, performance and functionality, looking at the hull, deck, rig and interior.

HULL, KEEL AND RUDDER

Deciding on the size of a boat is not only the most important choice, but also the most difficult, and it is here that most serious mistakes are made. Some people choose a boat that is too large for their requirements, too difficult to handle short-handed and more expensive to run and maintain. Electric winches, furlers and bow-thrusters have made larger boats much easier to handle, but ask yourself this: ‘Can I sail this boat with just my partner or, in an emergency, on my own?’

But having said all that, my research shows that more owners complain about their boat being too small. It is a well-known fact that lack of space or privacy can have a negative effect on morale and lead to friction among crew on a long passage.

Monohull versus multihull

Deciding whether to go for one hull or two is perhaps an even more difficult choice than that of size. With regards to three hulls – I am yet to be persuaded that trimarans are suitable to be sailed on offshore passages by a small family crew.

In the early days there were similar doubts about the suitability of catamarans for offshore sailing, but their design has greatly improved, architects have put a lot of thought into their safety, while builders have done their best to produce strong, seaworthy craft. Their ever-increasing popularity among long-distance cruisers is the best proof of that. As they have many advantages over a monohull of the same length, I have an open mind on the subject of one hull or two.

However, those who plan to set off in a catamaran on a long voyage must choose their route carefully to minimise the risk of encountering dangerous weather. Always observe the safe seasons, and be aware of a catamaran’s weak points. Catamarans are much less forgiving than monohulls when weather conditions deteriorate. A catamaran needs to be helped to overcome extreme conditions, whereas a well-found monohull can be battened down and left to its own devices.

Rudders

According to various search and rescue authorities and figures compiled by the ARC and other offshore rallies, more cruising boats have been abandoned in the last 30 years because of rudder failure than for any other reason. A recent example is that of the yacht Dove II, which lost its rudder 400 miles east of Barbados while on passage to the Caribbean in December 2016. The crew, a couple with their children and another crewmember, were unable to improvise an emergency steering system and had to be rescued, abandoning the boat.

Rudders are an essential design feature that should dictate the choice of boat. Suspended rudders have gradually migrated from racing to cruising boats and, unprotected by at least a partial skeg, are extremely vulnerable. If you cannot avoid a boat with this kind of rudder, at least insist that the lower half of the rudder is sacrificial, as this is where it is most likely to be hit by debris. Regardless of the type of rudder, there must be an adequate emergency backup steering system that is easy to set up and known to all members of the crew.

On my Garcia Exploration 45, Aventura IV, a boat that I helped to design to my exact specifications, the two aluminium rudders are supported by skegs. As an added protection, the upper section of the rudder blades is made of light composite material that will crumple and compress without causing any damage to the hull itself. This is exactly what happened in a collision with a large lump of ice in the Arctic and the rudder continued to function normally for several thousand miles until repairs could be made.

Keel, draught and displacement

In all my research on the subject of ideal draught and keel type, there was a consensus that a fixed keel may be better suited for ocean passages, whereas shallow draught, whether with a shorter keel and bulb or a centreboard arrangement, was preferable when cruising. My two last boats had a centreboard and I can state unequivocally that both from the safety and convenience point of view, a centreboard works perfectly, both when exploring shallow areas and on passage.

Displacement should be a serious consideration for those interested in sailing performance, as I know too well from personal experience. At nine tons for her 36ft, my first Aventura was on the heavy side and an indifferent sailer in light winds.

I was determined to get a boat with a lighter displacement for my third Aventura. Indeed Aventura III’s designed displacement of 9.5 tons for a beamy 43-footer was as close to perfect as possible and I always made sure to keep her weight down to a reasonable level.

Hull material

As in the case of displacement, unless hull material is put at the top of the list of priorities, or you order a one-off, this is another decision that may be taken out of your hands. In most cases boats are built in the most suitable material the architect and builder have agreed upon. For a long voyage the builder might be persuaded to put some additional strength in critical areas, so it is worth discussing this as early as possible in the process so that such modifications can be done during the initial building stages.

Metal hulls, whether steel or aluminium, are attractive for their intrinsic strength, but there are disadvantages to both materials as well. Steel hulls and decks need good initial preparation for painting, and then careful maintenance throughout the boat’s lifetime. In the case of aluminium hulls, some people may be concerned about the risk of electrolytic reaction. This is quite unjustified: modern alloys as well as building methods have taken care of that.

SAILS, DECK GEAR AND RIGGING

For a long voyage one should make sure that the mainsail is made as strong as possible, with double, ideally triple UV-resistant zigzag-stitching and protection patches in the areas where the sail may touch the spreaders when fully let out. The furling foresail(s) should be provided with anti-UV strips.

I have considered the subject of the type of mainsail on a cruising boat and have no doubt that a fully battened mainsail, with slab reefing, is still the best answer for those who are interested in performance. Mainsail furling systems have evolved, and some of the boom furling arrangements combine the best of two worlds, by offering a quick and easy way to reduce sail surface, and, as the furling mainsail is provided with battens, the loss of performance is quite minimal.

Spinnakers and headsails

Spinnakers should be provided with adequate dousers or it will be difficult to drop them in a squall when this needs to be done quickly. While there isn’t much to choose between well-cut spinnakers, some dousers are better than others. Ideally, as on the Parasailor, the collar should be rigid and not made of soft material. The douser collar should also have a wide enough mouth to snuff the spinnaker easily.

Various light weather sails, such as asymmetric spinnakers, code zeros, cruising chutes, gennakers etc, come with their own furling gear, and can be a useful addition to the sailing wardrobe, as they are relatively easy to set up and take down on a short-handed boat.

Continues below…

Rigging

Initially I was determined to have a cutter rig on Aventura IV, but was eventually persuaded that a fractional rig with swept-back spreaders would be more efficient than a standard cutter rig. Indeed, the Solent jib performed very well when close-hauled and the mast was also much better stayed than on the previous Aventura. But I still insisted on a split rig, with a staysail set on an inner forestay to be used in stronger winds. It was a good solution and reinforced my conviction that the flexibility provided by a two-foresail configuration is a major advantage on any boat over 40ft.

While setting up the running rigging it is a good idea to have a close look at the existing deck layout and the run of the various sheets and lines, which should have a clear unobstructed run back to the cockpit helped by turning blocks at critical points.

As to halyards, the mast should have enough dedicated channels for spinnaker and foresail halyards, and their backups. On Aventura IV, the mainsail halyard was of Dyneema non-stretch material and I decided to have the boom topping lift from the same material so as to have a permanent backup for the mainsail halyard. I always prefer to have two spinnaker halyards so they can be used on the lee side when the sail is hoisted. The same halyards were used for the code 0 sail.

Deck layout

An efficient and functional deck layout is an essential safety feature that allows me and my crew to do most of the sail handling jobs from the cockpit. It is essential that the lines coming to the cockpit are colour coded and brought to individual clutches. The same goes for the control lines from the furling gear. Some production boats fail badly in this respect.

For tradewind conditions, use a fixed pole when running or broad reaching. It is a simple and efficient system that I have used on all my boats, and one I highly recommend.

For efficient sail handling, especially when short-handed, electric winches are almost indispensible. For example, when a foresail needs to be furled quickly before a squall arrives, the furling line can be wound on the electric winch at the touch of a button, while the other hand can ease the sheet gradually as the sail is being furled. This effortless operation rarely takes more than one minute. It works equally well when reefing the mainsail from the cockpit, with the reefing line being hauled in by the electric winch while the halyard is paid out manually.

CREATURE COMFORTS

Comfortable sea berths are essential on an offshore passage and there should be at least one all-weather bunk for the person off watch. As we normally spend most of our day sitting, serious thought should also be given to comfortable seating both in the main cabin and cockpit. One aspect that is easily neglected if planning to sail with crew is to have two heads compartments.

Good insulation as well as adequate ventilation with sufficient hatches and dorade boxes for rough weather are features often missing on production boats built for temperate climates. They are vital for cruising in the tropics. Good ventilation and sound insulation are essential for the engine room.

A well thought-out galley should be a priority. Compact, U or L-shaped galleys are to be preferred over open-plan ones. There should be sufficient storage space in the immediate area of the galley so that all essential items are within easy reach.

Good cockpit protection was one of the main items mentioned by the surveyed captains when questioned about essential features on an offshore cruising boat. Some designers have managed to provide this useful feature by incorporating a hard dodger without spoiling the overall looks of the boat, but the majority continue to be limited to soft dodgers.

Engine location and size

The engine location and general accessibility are features that can easily be overlooked although they should be a high priority. All points that need regular inspection or maintenance should be easily accessible. Equally important is easy access to the main components: alternator(s), belts, starter motor, seawater pump and impeller, injectors, oil changing, fuel and oil filters, engine intake seacock, seawater trap, transmission and stern glands.

This is a very tall order and few production monohulls under 40ft would meet half of those requirements. This is one aspect where catamarans win hands down as their engines are normally located in the stern, and in most cases there is enough space around the engine to make them accessible from all sides.

Most cruising sailors, and that includes me, reckon their boat needs a bigger engine. The old yardstick has always been one horsepower per foot of length. Some prefer a slightly higher ratio of 1.2hp per foot of length. Others use a different yardstick by aiming for 5hp per ton of displacement. I broadly agree with the latter.

SAFETY

Whenever I am invited to express an opinion on a yacht, I always start by looking at the boat primarily from the safety point of view. Very few boats satisfy me on all the following questions:

• How well protected is the cockpit?
• How exposed is the person at the helm?
• How safe is it to work at the foot of the mast or on the foredeck?
• Are there sufficient handrails provided?
• Do stanchions and lifelines look strong and reliable?
• How dangerously low does the boom pass across the cockpit?
• How easily accessible is the main bilge and is it provided with a pump of adequate capacity, as well as an emergency backup?
• How accessible is the steering mechanism and what provision has been made for an emergency?
• Is the liferaft stowed in an easily accessible place from where it can be launched by the weakest member of the crew?
• How can the dinghy be stowed safely while on passage?
• How easily accessible is the anchor chain?
• How easy it is to board the boat from the water or retrieve an overboard person?

Jimmy Cornell

DECISION TIME

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new,” Albert Einstein

This is why it is so important to learn not only from your own mistakes, but also from those made by others. At one recent rally it struck me that many of the participants’ boats were well prepared, yet they themselves were not. Too much seemed to have been neglected or left until the last minute, from onboard email capability to essential spares, not to speak of a backup for the autopilot.

I discussed this subject with an old friend whose comments perfectly echo my own views: “We have the great advantage of having started off by sailing on simple boats with no sophisticated equipment. Once you have sailed on such a boat you can easily adjust to a more sophisticated boat, but not the other way around. ”

There is certainly a bewildering choice of yachts and equipment available today, but if you consider the essential features listed here and then prepare yourself and your chosen yacht as thoroughly and as early as possible, you will be in better shape for completing long voyages in greater safety and comfort than we were when we first started off.

The post The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht? appeared first on Yachting World.

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