On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts

On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts

On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts

Imperial Yachts is proud of its latest addition to their ‘On The Market’ portfolio. A superyacht they’re rightfully dubbing a ‘Ferrari of The Seas’, the Mangusta 50m M/Y Rush is the slickest way to accessorise the Med this summer. Now listed for sale, we talk speed and style with the Monaco brokerages’ Director, Julia Stewart.

It’s a failsafe combination; speed and style. When power is wrapped up in a sophisticated package there isn’t much to contest. Rush is a superyacht that combines these elements yet has never been offered for charter or sale before. Hoping for a buyer who will enjoy her in the summer, we asked about her suitability for the continental regions we all know and love.

Julia began, “RUSH is like a “Ferrari of the seas”: a highly-styled / stylish vessel with stabilizers, a quite unusual asset of 50m open speed boat of this quality. You can easily make a quick run from Monaco to Saint-Tropez, or join the most beautiful spots of Porto Cervo in perfect peace of mind, arriving with style and elegance.”

She continued, “Thinking about her speed is also thinking about the quality of cruising: here again, thanks to her pristine condition and intensive care, RUSH is among the best in her category. The Imperial management standards have a high reputation within our industry!”

Aptness for the Med confirmed, it surely won’t be too much of a challenge to find a new owner for RUSH’s impressive list of superlatives, but Mangusta-builds have a strong silhouette and we wanted to know who she would be most suited-to. “A buyer who loves speed, roaring design and unrivaled quality of materials is the ideal one to own RUSH,” explained Julia.

“The Mangusta 165’ range is unique, and so their owners: being a part of this legend is an achievement that we wish to her future buyer. She is not only fantastic from the outside: she boasts plethora of details that makes her really standing out in her range!”

But it’s not just her sporty exterior that provides a draw, on the inside, her interior reflects that of a much more spacious vessel. Ornate and inspiring, her list of stand-out features is endless.   

Julia described, “There is so much to say about her interiors, but let’s start by the beginning: it’s a vessel which was supervised during her construction by the Imperial teams, so we pushed the standards very high with Overmarine to reach the expectations of our client.”

Involved in the original build and design process and now her sale, Imperial Yachts are experts on Rush, inside and out. Details include, “An abundance of Wenge wood, Mother of Pearl, Onyx, silk blend carpets and high-end designed Foglizzo leather wall panels… her layout is also impressive: our teams did all the necessary for any space on board to be fully optimized: it results a 5-cabins layout with an additional spa/Mmassage room, very unusual on open boat.”

The best in her high octane class, 50m Rush is introduced to the market for the first time with Imperial Yachts and we look forward to seeing her new owners crossing horizons on board in the coming season.  

On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
On The Market: M/Y RUSH with Imperial Yachts
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Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

With interior furnishings that transform 66-metres into a plush dimension of luxury, M/Y Okto showcases puts Alberto Pinto into the spotlight. Pinto’s stylish masterpiece contemporary and cool matching her exterior futurism, defines and develops our notion of ‘tradition’ being just a shadow of todays superyacht fleet.

Andrea Vallicelli, the exterior designer of the ISA yacht, made his 2014 build year a representation of a new era in design. Heavily influenced by the automotive industry and with a sleek silhouette that is loud and commanding yet seriously elegant, Superyacht Okto is a head turner making a journey at sea full of character. 

A step on board, it is her deck space that sets the scene for balmy summer evenings welcoming guests with cocktails at the dozen. Her fusion of grey and black decking by Esthec even has the added pleasure of being heel-proof for guests due to its unique material, as well as aesthetically one of the most visually pleasing points of her space, for sundowners to escape into serenity. 

Throw in a 6-metre infinity pool with a blushing pink hue of underlighting that can be spotted from miles, Okto’s distinct character refuses not to be noticed. To give a sensory escape into the ocean, it can be filled with salt/fresh water, giving its owner a connection to the sea, allowing its guests to merge into natures wonder, even from the deck off Okto. 

Letting the party begin, Superyacht Okto knows how to turn on its charm for guests. With 1,000W speakers lead long summer nights into the early morning, her touch and go helipad on the foredeck means staying and leaving in style.

Style continues right into the interior, something Alberto Pinto, who’s previous work include 82-metre M/Y Alfa Nero, skilfully creates by harmonising the indoors and outdoors perfectly.  The marrying of nude and sultry creams, dashes of poignant blacks and warm golden hues, make her sumptuously modern while glamorously royal. Statement light fixtures are just the example of this, offering a visually alluring point of space that is trully eye-catching.

Inviting 12 guests, Okto makes a seclusion at sea feel effortless. The Owners Suite offers large and commanding skylights and a private fold down terrace allowing you to be at the mercy of the great out doors as if in touching distance of nature’s charms. Add in the tech of cutting-edge audio system and a 103-inch plasma TV,  its owner for a cinematic experience on board. Okto now available for sale, makes the perfect vessel to revel in stylish grandios on board serenity. 

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
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Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto

With interior furnishings that transform 66-metres into a plush dimension of luxury, M/Y Okto showcases puts Alberto Pinto into the spotlight. Pinto’s stylish masterpiece contemporary and cool matching her exterior futurism, defines and develops our notion of ‘tradition’ being just a shadow of todays superyacht fleet.

Andrea Vallicelli, the exterior designer of the ISA yacht, made his 2014 build year a representation of a new era in design. Heavily influenced by the automotive industry and with a sleek silhouette that is loud and commanding yet seriously elegant, Superyacht Okto is a head turner making a journey at sea full of character. 

A step on board, it is her deck space that sets the scene for balmy summer evenings welcoming guests with cocktails at the dozen. Her fusion of grey and black decking by Esthec even has the added pleasure of being heel-proof for guests due to its unique material, as well as aesthetically one of the most visually pleasing points of her space, for sundowners to escape into serenity. 

Throw in a 6-metre infinity pool with a blushing pink hue of underlighting that can be spotted from miles, Okto’s distinct character refuses not to be noticed. To give a sensory escape into the ocean, it can be filled with salt/fresh water, giving its owner a connection to the sea, allowing its guests to merge into natures wonder, even from the deck off Okto. 

Letting the party begin, Superyacht Okto knows how to turn on its charm for guests. With 1,000W speakers lead long summer nights into the early morning, her touch and go helipad on the foredeck means staying and leaving in style.

Style continues right into the interior, something Alberto Pinto, who’s previous work include 82-metre M/Y Alfa Nero, skilfully creates by harmonising the indoors and outdoors perfectly.  The marrying of nude and sultry creams, dashes of poignant blacks and warm golden hues, make her sumptuously modern while glamorously royal. Statement light fixtures are just the example of this, offering a visually alluring point of space that is trully eye-catching.

Inviting 12 guests, Okto makes a seclusion at sea feel effortless. The Owners Suite offers large and commanding skylights and a private fold down terrace allowing you to be at the mercy of the great out doors as if in touching distance of nature’s charms. Add in the tech of cutting-edge audio system and a 103-inch plasma TV,  its owner for a cinematic experience on board. Okto now available for sale, makes the perfect vessel to revel in stylish grandios on board serenity. 

Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
Interior Insight: A Statement of Style on Okto
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An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold

An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold

An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold

Show Time, a classically styled, immaculately maintained Broward superyacht, has become the latest brokerage announcement to emerge from IYC after Sales & Charter Consultant Richard Gray introduced a new owner to a 38.10-metre motor yacht with global appeal.

Launched in 1989, the traditional style of the all-aluminium Show Time is deceptive of its age, and after significant refits in 1995 and 2015, this yacht is built with timeless design in its DNA. Not only is the profile an effortless take on American yachting, but the interiors are cavernous, with expertly designed lifestyle spaces inside and across her three decks.

The interiors offer up to eight guests on board true relaxation with finely crafted furniture, elegant conversation spaces and a clean, stripped-back decor; however, it’s the smaller elements such as the automated dining table, wine station and curved staircase that provide the charm offensive.

This isn’t just a motoryacht, or part of the American inventory, this is a Broward with genuine character and a superyacht that defies market trend by simply attracting the right owner.

“Buyers in the 30 to 40-metre range want volume and size, but for good value,” explains Richard Gray. “Show Time is that yacht; a solid, all-aluminium vessel which ticked all the boxes for the new owners and everyone is happy with the result. The key to finding Show Time was an owner who wasn’t shy to look further afield to find the right yacht and didn’t compromise based on location. That’s the key, not limiting yourself to a region.”

The owner’s ongoing journey is now set to be filled with relaxation on the sun deck, as well as entertaining main deck aft thanks to TV, loungers and wet bar leading down to the main salon and the beach club; home to the arsenal of toys and effortless access to the ocean.

Listed at an asking price of $3,675,000, Show Time was listed with Denison Yachting and is the latest sales announcement to emerge from the IYC team.

An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold
An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold
An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold
An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold
An American Classic: Superyacht Show Time Sold
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The Unbridled Superyacht Experience of St. David

The Unbridled Superyacht Experience of St. David

The Unbridled Superyacht Experience of St. David

The idea of tying lines against a distant island to create a private beach, unlimited fine-dining and cocktails on the sundeck as the night draws in is the running ethos behind the charter machine that is St. David. Built by the Italian artisans at Benetti, this stand-out 60-metre has this week undergone a significant price reduction, providing the perfect double-take on an immaculately styled motor yacht.

With a lifestyle based on the best of the best, the price is no major motivator; but the yacht itself represents the very core of what owning a superyacht should entail. As you tender from your chosen marina to the yacht sat at anchor, the first-impression of St. David is that of intricately drawn lines, modern capabilities and a Winch Design style befitting of icon status.

It’s only when stepping on board does the gravity of your escape sink in. The world-class crew have the details in hand, and it’s your choice where to go, what to do and how to live on board. Take the 2008-built Benetti across the Mediterranean in search of undiscovered islands, coastal experiences and ocean excitement, or open the tender garage to unleash the arsenal of toys in your chosen cove.

Inside, space is another first-impression on offer as the volume of this 60-metre is deceptive of its size. Throughout the expertly styled interiors – refitted in 2017 – which can accommodate up to 12 guests and the external deck spaces which offer even more lifestyle appeal, this is an expansive superyacht built for enjoying the journey.

Now available for sale with West Nautical at an asking price of €22,500,000 following a €1,000,000 price reduction, St. David is a must-see superyacht for those looking to return to the Mediterranean with the Summer and experience a season on board like no other.

The Unbridled Superyacht Experience of St. David
The 60-metre Benetti superyacht St. David is on the market with West Nautical
The Unbridled Superyacht Experience of St. David
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Nobiksrug & Imperial Sign New 77-metre Yacht Project

Nobiksrug & Imperial Sign New 77-metre Yacht Project

Nobiksrug & Imperial Sign New 77-metre Yacht Project

Working with the world-renowned Nobiskrug shipyard, Imperial Yachts – acting as the broker, owner’s representative and build-supervisor – has today announced the signing of a remarkable new 77-metre superyacht project set to enter construction in Germany.

Teased in a stripped-back sketch, the first look at this brand-new project hints at a distinctive reverse bow and dynamic exterior – designed by the team at Winch Design – while five decks of imposing interior – styled by Sinot Exclusive Yacht Design – and expansive beach club area offers an unparalleled lifestyle.

“This new superyacht is an exciting project we are impatient to start. It will be the second over 70-metre length superyacht we will build together with Nobiskrug after the magnificent Project 783 delivered in 2012, and this project is calling many others to be developed. 

We are delighted to initiate new strong and successful collaborations with Andrew Winch and Sinot Design, making this new 77-metre Nobiskrug superyacht an outstanding vessel at her delivery and most certainly a class of her own”, says Julia Stewart, Director of Imperial.

“With the two remarkable teams of designers and an experienced superyacht management company, we are truly excited to realize this bespoke project,” says Holger Kahl, Managing Director of Nobiskrug.

Flowing lines, an undoubtedly inspired use of glass given the hints across the profile and a truly distinctive character, this state-of-the-art project is set to be built under the new Tier 3 regulations and the very new Red Ensign Group Yacht Code Part A.

Due for completion in Spring 2021, we can’t wait to see more from the shipyard, supervisors and designers as the build progresses.

Nobiksrug & Imperial Sign New 77-metre Yacht Project
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Another 50-Metre in the Yard for Genova’s Tankoa

Another 50-Metre in the Yard for Genova’s Tankoa

Another 50-Metre in the Yard for Genova’s Tankoa

When Vertige hit the water back in 2017, her lines and sophistication surpassed expectations, bringing to the water a delicately carved masterpiece; a testament to shipyard, Tankoa. One year on and the yard have announced the build of a second 50m following in the footsteps of her sister-ship, with thanks to a sale process steered by SINOS S.A.

With Florence-based Francesco Paszkowski responsible for the design of the S502 Elettra model, we expect to see a build just as timeless, yet futuristic as Vertige. Her interior, designed with free-flowing spaces and separate crew-pathways for ultimate privacy, has been created to ensure optimal circulation.

From renderings, subtle golden tones and rich creamy hues add to the space-creation, leaving light and fuss-free rooms that add to the air of relaxation.

The exterior spaces are also expected to echo the calm formula found within. Al fresco dining space is a-plenty, while on the upper deck, there’s a comfortable sky lounge and on the foredeck, a solarium and open-air lounge for maximum exposure to the ocean. But it doesn’t end there. The fly-deck is another outdoor solace where sofas, sunbeds, a bar and Jacuzzi provide the perfect place to entertain.

Neverthless, the S502 Elettra won’t be an exact reflection of Vertige. Innovations in engineering have developed a forward-thinking hybrid propulsion system, which offers 4 differing operation modes. Ranging from full-speed to hybrid and diesel electric, different ranges at various speeds can be obtained; a nod to the environmental considerations that many owners now wish to fulfill.

Hoping to be the next pillar of excellence in the yard’s boutique collection of builds, Elettra joins 71m C102 in the Tankoa shed, which is due for launch later this year. With plenty of activity underway, we look forward to seeing the Italian-builders’ developments both in and out of the shed.

Tankoa 50M Vertige, Launched 2017
Interior Renderings
Interior Renderings
Interior Renderings
Interior Renderings
Tankoa 50M Vertige, Launched 2017
Interior Renderings
Tankoa Announce Sale of 50M S502 Elettra
Tankoa 50M Vertige, Launched 2017
Tankoa 50M Vertige, Launched 2017
Tankoa 50M Vertige, Launched 2017
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Part 2: Superyachts of Palm Beach Boat Show 2018

Part 2: Superyachts of Palm Beach Boat Show 2018

Part 2: Superyachts of Palm Beach Boat Show 2018

With a shining light on the thriving American market, today’s Palm Beach Boat Show is set to kick off with what has been great expectation, high hopes for activity and of course; results. With the doors swinging open, and the sunny slice of Florida ready and raring to go, we take a look at some of the fleet members available on display from March 22nd to March 25th.

Coral OceanMoran Yacht & Ship
For sale with Moran Yacht & Ship, this classic ocean spectacle M/Y Coral Ocean, offers an on-board tropical escape. Her worldly corners to unwind offer interior flairs such as her wooden masks and tribal textures, offering a vibrant global allure made for an ocean adventure. Her recent refit updated her classic 1994 build in 2016, transforming the work of legendary designer Jon Bannenberg.

She features spacious accommodation for 12 guests in 6 staterooms. Her commanding stature covers an impressive 72.6-metres. Her best perk? Direct access from the lower deck guest suites straight to the gym and spa complex- complete with steam room- leading to the swim platform and beach club.

Lady SBurgess Yachts
Amels’ Lady S offers all the plush perks of a five-star plus escape with pure indulgence across five magnificent decks. Now available for charter with Burgess Yachts, her imposing 68.5-metres, features an artistic space that merges original Chagall and Frankenthaler artwork, Loro Piana cashmeres and accessories from Hermes, Asprey, Linley, Lalique and Baccarat.

Making a lavish ocean home living into a reality, her saloon is perfect for entertaining, able to convert into a home cinema for a full-on theatre experience. Hosting up to 12 guests, her stunning spiral staircase compliment her master suite, inclusive of a separate office, walk-in wardrobes, his and her bathrooms and a double rainfall shower. Throw in a VIP suite (considered one of the largest in superyachting) and you are ready set go on a dream charter with Burgess Yachts. 

Mine GamesGalati Yacht Sales
Available for sale with Galati Yacht Sales, Mine Games is a stunning stallion fleet member of Benetti Yachts, blending reputable build credibility with interior glamour and sun-deck resides. Her magic design on board by Studio Massari offers a marriage of warm hazel hues coupled with plush creme upholstery for a comforting reprieve into ocean indulgence. Stand-out featured include her Swarovski crystals embedded furniture and glossy Italian marbles delighting up to 12 guests in 6 cabins. A yoga spot on the sun-deck and Turkish bath make her all the more enviable, wrapped up in 62-metres for a new owner.

Book EndsHeesen Yachts USA
This 47-metre Heesen is straight from the boards of Bannenberg & Rowell, offers a rich and sultry escape inspired by the theme of ‘kinetic energy’. This home away from home on Book Ends features the ideal mergings of interior and exterior spaces, ideal therefore for the longer cruises across the Atlantic, for an owner well equipped to take on the more remote corners of the world.

Designed by Frank Laupman of Omega Architects on the exterior meets the plush and neutral interior, which can accommodate 12 guests in five suites, offers an array of hi-tech finishes. Light and airy in ambience, with graphics subtly referencing themes of ‘energy’, her Dutch magic makes her a truly remarkable (and unique) fleet member, considered a modern masterpiece of 2017. 

LionshareIYC Yachts
For sale with IYC, Heesen’s Lionshare is a timeless classic transforming a 1987 build into a contemporary space full of subtle nuances and character.  Her most welcome update which took place with a recent refit in 2017 sustained her soft hardwood floors, light and airy palette and richer oaks that appear throughout. Lionshare’s well appointed staterooms offer the ideal sanctuary for entertainment, while having had a transatlantic crossing under her belt her comfort and luxury is evident.  Splashes of blue throughout pay homage to the ocean, while her Dutch Heesen build is reason enough to call this fierce fleet member an ocean home. 

M/Y Coral Ocean
M/Y Lady S
M/Y Mine Games
M/Y Lionshare
M/Y Mine Games
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Lürssen Project Icecap Sold by Moran Yacht & Ship

Lürssen Project Icecap Sold by Moran Yacht & Ship

Lürssen Project Icecap Sold by Moran Yacht & Ship

Currently under construction at Lürssen Yachts, Moran Yacht & Ship has today announced the sale of Project Icecap; a 109-metre motor yacht with state-of-the-art technology surrounding energy saving and diesel-electric propulsion.

While details are (naturally) still scarce, the distinctive rugged lines of Project Icecap are something entirely new given the vast aft, extreme height and powerful bow.

Seemingly born from the desire to cruise new grounds, this huge superyacht is yet another example of the Lürssen Yachts / Moran Yacht & Ship collaboration which has seen countless superyacht projects hit the water such as AuroraProject Fiji and the upcoming Project Redwood to name a few.

Now sold, Project Icecap is an exciting technological advancement given the diesel-electric propulsion, energy efficiency, power storage and heating systems throughout; not to mention the scale of which they have to function.

At over 6500 GRT, this complex and cavernous project will no doubt set new bars for superyachts emerging in the next few years and we can’t wait to bring you more from the Moran Yacht & Ship New Construction Team as it progresses.

Lürssen Project Icecap Sold by Moran Yacht & Ship
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The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht?

The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht?

Jimmy Cornell gives his expert analysis of the essential features that any offshore cruising yacht should have

Choosing a boat for offshore cruising is not a decision to be taken lightly. I have researched this topic on dozens of rallies, speaking to hundred of skippers. Everyone you speak to will have a different point of view about which boat is best and why, but few question the importance of getting it right.

No matter what your budget, there is a bewildering array of choice and a number of important decisions to make, any one of which could severely impact the enjoyment and eventual success of your voyage. What follows may serve as a checklist for first-timers as well as seasoned ocean sailors in helping to decide the essential elements concerning safety, comfort, performance and functionality, looking at the hull, deck, rig and interior.

HULL, KEEL AND RUDDER

Deciding on the size of a boat is not only the most important choice, but also the most difficult, and it is here that most serious mistakes are made. Some people choose a boat that is too large for their requirements, too difficult to handle short-handed and more expensive to run and maintain. Electric winches, furlers and bow-thrusters have made larger boats much easier to handle, but ask yourself this: ‘Can I sail this boat with just my partner or, in an emergency, on my own?’

But having said all that, my research shows that more owners complain about their boat being too small. It is a well-known fact that lack of space or privacy can have a negative effect on morale and lead to friction among crew on a long passage.

Monohull versus multihull

Deciding whether to go for one hull or two is perhaps an even more difficult choice than that of size. With regards to three hulls – I am yet to be persuaded that trimarans are suitable to be sailed on offshore passages by a small family crew.

In the early days there were similar doubts about the suitability of catamarans for offshore sailing, but their design has greatly improved, architects have put a lot of thought into their safety, while builders have done their best to produce strong, seaworthy craft. Their ever-increasing popularity among long-distance cruisers is the best proof of that. As they have many advantages over a monohull of the same length, I have an open mind on the subject of one hull or two.

However, those who plan to set off in a catamaran on a long voyage must choose their route carefully to minimise the risk of encountering dangerous weather. Always observe the safe seasons, and be aware of a catamaran’s weak points. Catamarans are much less forgiving than monohulls when weather conditions deteriorate. A catamaran needs to be helped to overcome extreme conditions, whereas a well-found monohull can be battened down and left to its own devices.

Rudders

According to various search and rescue authorities and figures compiled by the ARC and other offshore rallies, more cruising boats have been abandoned in the last 30 years because of rudder failure than for any other reason. A recent example is that of the yacht Dove II, which lost its rudder 400 miles east of Barbados while on passage to the Caribbean in December 2016. The crew, a couple with their children and another crewmember, were unable to improvise an emergency steering system and had to be rescued, abandoning the boat.

Rudders are an essential design feature that should dictate the choice of boat. Suspended rudders have gradually migrated from racing to cruising boats and, unprotected by at least a partial skeg, are extremely vulnerable. If you cannot avoid a boat with this kind of rudder, at least insist that the lower half of the rudder is sacrificial, as this is where it is most likely to be hit by debris. Regardless of the type of rudder, there must be an adequate emergency backup steering system that is easy to set up and known to all members of the crew.

On my Garcia Exploration 45, Aventura IV, a boat that I helped to design to my exact specifications, the two aluminium rudders are supported by skegs. As an added protection, the upper section of the rudder blades is made of light composite material that will crumple and compress without causing any damage to the hull itself. This is exactly what happened in a collision with a large lump of ice in the Arctic and the rudder continued to function normally for several thousand miles until repairs could be made.

Keel, draught and displacement

In all my research on the subject of ideal draught and keel type, there was a consensus that a fixed keel may be better suited for ocean passages, whereas shallow draught, whether with a shorter keel and bulb or a centreboard arrangement, was preferable when cruising. My two last boats had a centreboard and I can state unequivocally that both from the safety and convenience point of view, a centreboard works perfectly, both when exploring shallow areas and on passage.

Displacement should be a serious consideration for those interested in sailing performance, as I know too well from personal experience. At nine tons for her 36ft, my first Aventura was on the heavy side and an indifferent sailer in light winds.

I was determined to get a boat with a lighter displacement for my third Aventura. Indeed Aventura III’s designed displacement of 9.5 tons for a beamy 43-footer was as close to perfect as possible and I always made sure to keep her weight down to a reasonable level.

Hull material

As in the case of displacement, unless hull material is put at the top of the list of priorities, or you order a one-off, this is another decision that may be taken out of your hands. In most cases boats are built in the most suitable material the architect and builder have agreed upon. For a long voyage the builder might be persuaded to put some additional strength in critical areas, so it is worth discussing this as early as possible in the process so that such modifications can be done during the initial building stages.

Metal hulls, whether steel or aluminium, are attractive for their intrinsic strength, but there are disadvantages to both materials as well. Steel hulls and decks need good initial preparation for painting, and then careful maintenance throughout the boat’s lifetime. In the case of aluminium hulls, some people may be concerned about the risk of electrolytic reaction. This is quite unjustified: modern alloys as well as building methods have taken care of that.

SAILS, DECK GEAR AND RIGGING

For a long voyage one should make sure that the mainsail is made as strong as possible, with double, ideally triple UV-resistant zigzag-stitching and protection patches in the areas where the sail may touch the spreaders when fully let out. The furling foresail(s) should be provided with anti-UV strips.

I have considered the subject of the type of mainsail on a cruising boat and have no doubt that a fully battened mainsail, with slab reefing, is still the best answer for those who are interested in performance. Mainsail furling systems have evolved, and some of the boom furling arrangements combine the best of two worlds, by offering a quick and easy way to reduce sail surface, and, as the furling mainsail is provided with battens, the loss of performance is quite minimal.

Spinnakers and headsails

Spinnakers should be provided with adequate dousers or it will be difficult to drop them in a squall when this needs to be done quickly. While there isn’t much to choose between well-cut spinnakers, some dousers are better than others. Ideally, as on the Parasailor, the collar should be rigid and not made of soft material. The douser collar should also have a wide enough mouth to snuff the spinnaker easily.

Various light weather sails, such as asymmetric spinnakers, code zeros, cruising chutes, gennakers etc, come with their own furling gear, and can be a useful addition to the sailing wardrobe, as they are relatively easy to set up and take down on a short-handed boat.

Continues below…

Rigging

Initially I was determined to have a cutter rig on Aventura IV, but was eventually persuaded that a fractional rig with swept-back spreaders would be more efficient than a standard cutter rig. Indeed, the Solent jib performed very well when close-hauled and the mast was also much better stayed than on the previous Aventura. But I still insisted on a split rig, with a staysail set on an inner forestay to be used in stronger winds. It was a good solution and reinforced my conviction that the flexibility provided by a two-foresail configuration is a major advantage on any boat over 40ft.

While setting up the running rigging it is a good idea to have a close look at the existing deck layout and the run of the various sheets and lines, which should have a clear unobstructed run back to the cockpit helped by turning blocks at critical points.

As to halyards, the mast should have enough dedicated channels for spinnaker and foresail halyards, and their backups. On Aventura IV, the mainsail halyard was of Dyneema non-stretch material and I decided to have the boom topping lift from the same material so as to have a permanent backup for the mainsail halyard. I always prefer to have two spinnaker halyards so they can be used on the lee side when the sail is hoisted. The same halyards were used for the code 0 sail.

Deck layout

An efficient and functional deck layout is an essential safety feature that allows me and my crew to do most of the sail handling jobs from the cockpit. It is essential that the lines coming to the cockpit are colour coded and brought to individual clutches. The same goes for the control lines from the furling gear. Some production boats fail badly in this respect.

For tradewind conditions, use a fixed pole when running or broad reaching. It is a simple and efficient system that I have used on all my boats, and one I highly recommend.

For efficient sail handling, especially when short-handed, electric winches are almost indispensible. For example, when a foresail needs to be furled quickly before a squall arrives, the furling line can be wound on the electric winch at the touch of a button, while the other hand can ease the sheet gradually as the sail is being furled. This effortless operation rarely takes more than one minute. It works equally well when reefing the mainsail from the cockpit, with the reefing line being hauled in by the electric winch while the halyard is paid out manually.

CREATURE COMFORTS

Comfortable sea berths are essential on an offshore passage and there should be at least one all-weather bunk for the person off watch. As we normally spend most of our day sitting, serious thought should also be given to comfortable seating both in the main cabin and cockpit. One aspect that is easily neglected if planning to sail with crew is to have two heads compartments.

Good insulation as well as adequate ventilation with sufficient hatches and dorade boxes for rough weather are features often missing on production boats built for temperate climates. They are vital for cruising in the tropics. Good ventilation and sound insulation are essential for the engine room.

A well thought-out galley should be a priority. Compact, U or L-shaped galleys are to be preferred over open-plan ones. There should be sufficient storage space in the immediate area of the galley so that all essential items are within easy reach.

Good cockpit protection was one of the main items mentioned by the surveyed captains when questioned about essential features on an offshore cruising boat. Some designers have managed to provide this useful feature by incorporating a hard dodger without spoiling the overall looks of the boat, but the majority continue to be limited to soft dodgers.

Engine location and size

The engine location and general accessibility are features that can easily be overlooked although they should be a high priority. All points that need regular inspection or maintenance should be easily accessible. Equally important is easy access to the main components: alternator(s), belts, starter motor, seawater pump and impeller, injectors, oil changing, fuel and oil filters, engine intake seacock, seawater trap, transmission and stern glands.

This is a very tall order and few production monohulls under 40ft would meet half of those requirements. This is one aspect where catamarans win hands down as their engines are normally located in the stern, and in most cases there is enough space around the engine to make them accessible from all sides.

Most cruising sailors, and that includes me, reckon their boat needs a bigger engine. The old yardstick has always been one horsepower per foot of length. Some prefer a slightly higher ratio of 1.2hp per foot of length. Others use a different yardstick by aiming for 5hp per ton of displacement. I broadly agree with the latter.

SAFETY

Whenever I am invited to express an opinion on a yacht, I always start by looking at the boat primarily from the safety point of view. Very few boats satisfy me on all the following questions:

• How well protected is the cockpit?
• How exposed is the person at the helm?
• How safe is it to work at the foot of the mast or on the foredeck?
• Are there sufficient handrails provided?
• Do stanchions and lifelines look strong and reliable?
• How dangerously low does the boom pass across the cockpit?
• How easily accessible is the main bilge and is it provided with a pump of adequate capacity, as well as an emergency backup?
• How accessible is the steering mechanism and what provision has been made for an emergency?
• Is the liferaft stowed in an easily accessible place from where it can be launched by the weakest member of the crew?
• How can the dinghy be stowed safely while on passage?
• How easily accessible is the anchor chain?
• How easy it is to board the boat from the water or retrieve an overboard person?

Jimmy Cornell

DECISION TIME

“Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new,” Albert Einstein

This is why it is so important to learn not only from your own mistakes, but also from those made by others. At one recent rally it struck me that many of the participants’ boats were well prepared, yet they themselves were not. Too much seemed to have been neglected or left until the last minute, from onboard email capability to essential spares, not to speak of a backup for the autopilot.

I discussed this subject with an old friend whose comments perfectly echo my own views: “We have the great advantage of having started off by sailing on simple boats with no sophisticated equipment. Once you have sailed on such a boat you can easily adjust to a more sophisticated boat, but not the other way around. ”

There is certainly a bewildering choice of yachts and equipment available today, but if you consider the essential features listed here and then prepare yourself and your chosen yacht as thoroughly and as early as possible, you will be in better shape for completing long voyages in greater safety and comfort than we were when we first started off.

The post The perfect boat: what makes an ideal offshore cruising yacht? appeared first on Yachting World.

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